Why I wrote Goddesses For Every Day

A resurgence of the sacred feminine is sweeping the planet, and I wanted to know who the goddess really is.  What characterizes the feminine side of the divine?  It seemed to me that these realities profoundly affect the way women view and value themselves and likewise how men perceive everything feminine.

The idea of wisdom, especially divine wisdom, is considered feminine in every tradition where it’s named as a construct. That includes Judaism and Christianity.  But this idea has been forgotten.  In the Middle Ages it was heresy to revere the sacred feminine, so this reverence went underground.  An example is Sapientia,  “lady wisdom,” in Latin.  She was a hidden goddess of philosophical inquiry when the sacred feminine was heresy.  Beautiful antiphons are still chanted to her as part of Catholic advent liturgy.

I also believe that humanity has a deep need to revere the feminine side of the divine, and this unmet need is resurfacing in our time in such examples as the phenomenal popularity of the The Da Vinci Code book and film, which featured feminine symbols.  Apparitions of Mary, mother of Jesus, are on the rise around the world.  One of the best documented instances in recent times took place in Zeitoun, Egypt, where hundreds of thousands of people of diverse beliefs stood side by side, over a period of twenty-three years, watching in awe as Mary appeared over a small church in a suburb of Cairo.  Millions make annual pilgrimages to Fatima, Lourdes, and the site of the church of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico.  The site in Mexico is the most-visited Catholic site, second only to the Vatican.  The tremendous outpouring of love and concern in response to the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, also spoke to our need to revere a feminine archetype.   The goddess has been known as Queen of Heaven and Great Mother in many cultures, and it seems vital that she reclaim her throne.

Goddess Astrology

As far as I know, I’m birthing something new. I have been inspired through my research to create a special astrology reading which focuses on feminine archetypes in an astrological chart. This include planets, asteroids and dwarf planets, and other solar system objects in relationship to each other as well to planets in the birth chart. The purpose is empowerment of the feminine principle through recognition, redemption and reclamation of the disenfranchised elements of the Sacred Feminine.  Building on traditional interpretations of the Earth, Moon and Venus, a unique, personal reading will examine these feminine principles and placements within the natal chart, and explore ways to consciously integrate the energies into a holistic pattern of expression.

Other elements such as feminine dwarf planets, asteroids, centaurs, Trans-Neptunian Objects and fixed stars will deepen and enrich the interpretation. This will demonstrate the multifaceted nature of the feminine through strengths, challenges blocked energy and blind spots. Although I suspect this reading will appeal mostly to women, men would certainly benefit and gain insight into the operation of feminine archetypes operating in their psyches. This might reveal a great deal about relationship dynamics. After several thousand years darkness and repression, the feminine principle has awakened and is growing in power and majesty around the planet. The world needs her wisdom, strength and power, and I hope this insight will aid that process.

Wisdom & the Divine Feminine

A resurgence of the sacred feminine is sweeping the planet, and I wanted to know who the goddess really is.  What characterizes the feminine side of the divine?  It seemed to me that these realities profoundly affect the way women view and value themselves and likewise how men perceive everything feminine.

The idea of wisdom, especially divine wisdom, is considered feminine in every tradition where it’s named as a construct. That includes Judaism and Christianity.  But this idea has been forgotten.  In the Middle Ages it was heresy to revere the sacred feminine, so this reverence went underground.  An example is Sapientia,  “lady wisdom,” in Latin.  She was a hidden goddess of philosophical inquiry when the sacred feminine was heresy.  Beautiful antiphons are still chanted to her as part of Catholic advent liturgy.

I also believe that humanity has a deep need to revere the feminine side of the divine, and this unmet need is resurfacing in our time in such examples as the phenomenal popularity of the The Da Vinci Code book and film, which featured feminine symbols.  Apparitions of Mary, mother of Jesus, are on the rise around the world.  One of the best documented instances in recent times took place in Zeitoun, Egypt, where hundreds of thousands of people of diverse beliefs stood side by side, over a period of twenty-three years, watching in awe as Mary appeared over a small church in a suburb of Cairo.  Millions make annual pilgrimages to Fatima, Lourdes, and the site of the church of Our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico.  The site in Mexico is the most-visited Catholic site, second only to the Vatican.  The tremendous outpouring of love and concern in response to the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, also spoke to our need to revere a feminine archetype.   The goddess has been known as Queen of Heaven and Great Mother in many cultures, and it seems vital that she reclaim her throne.

Did Goddess precede God?

My search to understand this phenomenon led me back in time nearly 4,000 years. Thousands of years ago there was a Great Goddess who manifested as a trinity long before the masculine version of the bible.  She was revered around the world as Maiden, Mother, and Crone, or Elder.  She is still honored in many places by indigenous people.  She was complex, and not always gentle, but understanding her nature, and moving in rhythm with her, was related to hunting cycles and growing seasons.  Her worship involved a reciprocity with the Earth and the creatures she gives life.

As I studied the myths and religions of other cultures, I learned that powerful goddesses were diminished, even demonized, with the rise of the patriarchy.  In the absence of a feminine divine presence, half of humanity becomes inferior, without a direct connection or relationship to divine nature.  As a result, in western culture, we have devalued aspects for the feminine for 4,000 years, effectively pushing these archetypes beneath our conscious awareness.

Serious scholars of myth have noticed that the tenor of the stories began to change nearly four millennia ago.  Symptoms of this shift in Greek myths included an increasing glorification of war, accompanied by a deteriorating value of agriculture and cyclical time.  The importance of the goddess has essentially been buried alive in western consciousness.

The resulting loss of half of the divine has ruptured mind and heart, reverberating through the centuries in violence, alienation and growing environmental devastation.  We no long move in harmony with natural cycles, and I believe our lack of balance with natural seasons of earth an sky has brought us to a precarious place.

Joseph Campbell, author and scholar of myth, demonstrated that stories of the hero’s journey, and the essential aspects of myth, are echoed in every culture.  Psychiatrist Carl Jung, who popularized the term archetype, warned that unacknowledged aspects of our collective consciousness do not disappear, instead they go underground, emerging in dreams and sometimes psychoses.  I believe it is vital to restore the many-faceted powers of powerful feminine icons to conscious awareness and help humanity become more sane.

Why is a Goddess important?

The question begs another question.  Whose god are we discussing?  Scholars have assumed that the concept of monotheism emerged rather suddenly with the Hebrews, but increasingly biblical archeology, and a wider study of other cultures, are revealing a different picture.  The idea of an overarching and unifying divine principle has existed in diverse cultures, including Egypt and some so-called primitive groups.  But the idea certainly took hold in the patriarchies of Judaism, Christianity and Islam and has dominated religious orthodoxy for more than two millennia. It also seems that followers of monotheism, or what are called the Abrahamic religions, are not very tolerant of dissent when they are in a position of power.

The male god of the Abrahamic religions is not a warm and welcoming deity.  Rather, he is an aloof, vengeful and authoritarian father figure who, in Christianity, sent his son to be murdered, and dooms his wavering children to eternal damnation in a fiery hell. Missing from this picture is the nurturing warmth and love provided by a mother goddess.  As a result, half of humanity has been devalued and stripped of power. That’s changing, but I believe it’s vital to restore balance by reclaiming the feminine side of the divine.

Things were different in the early days of Christianity.  There was a rich diversity and sense of exploration in the days following the death of Jesus and final destruction of the Jerusalem temple.  Later, the emerging Church of Rome declared many of these beliefs to be heresy and priceless text were burned, forgotten and suppressed for eighteen centuries.  Then in 1945 and 1947 the stunning Nag Hammadi codices, and the Dead Sea Scrolls, were unearthed in Egypt and Israel.  The contents of these caches caused quite a stir in biblical scholarship.